Tag Archives: smoking

Post Of The week – Saturday 7th January, 2017

1) How Do Connectomes Contribute to Human Cognition? The answer to this question is explained in this brief article from Scientific American. It sums up neatly how we understand structure and plasticity within the brain.   2) Eating Disorders In Males We quote the figure of 9:1 for the ratio of female to male diagnosis of […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday December 3rd 2016

1) Implications Of Research For The Economy This comes not from a piece of peer reviewed research but rather from a commercial research company. It suggests that lack of sleep costs the economy of the UK £40 billion because people who sleep less than seven hours a night are more at risk of illness and […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 18th September 2016

1) Stress And Depression I’ve not had time to listen to more than a fraction of this but it sounds really interesting. Carmine Pariante from King’s College London explores the links between stress and depression. This is important for what it tells us about the relationship between nature and nurture as well as about the […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 21st August 2016

1) The Safety Of Interventions For Smoking When I started teaching the addictive behaviour option in 2012, drug treatments for addiction seemed dangerously experimental. This article shows how far we have come. It reports on a large scale, multi-centre RCT looking at the risks associated with bupropion, varenicline and NRT as interventions for smoking. There […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday, 26th June 2016

1) Robert Cialdini On Social Psychology Here’s Robert Cialdini explaining what social psychology, and in particular social influence research, is all about.   2) The Personality Myth This programme from NPR explores personality through several personal stories. In thinking about nature-nurture and free will and determinism, these stories are rather important.   3) Recovering From […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday June 4th, 2016

1) Could A Neuroscientist Understand A Microprocessor? This article has as its starting point the analysis of the microprocessor which drove Mac computers 30 years ago. https://elusiveself.wordpress.com/2016/05/29/false-functional-inference-what-does-it-mean-to-understand-the-brain/ It leads to consideration of what we can and cannot infer about the brain. We tend to find the cognitive approach impressive because it uses computer models to describe the […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 21st May 2016

1) Food Advertising The way in which food is advertised and packaged gets a mention as a factor influencing attitudes to food and a factor influencing obesity. This article suggests that in addition to bans on television advertising, measures need to be taken to restrict billboard advertising and other forms of marketing. https://theconversation.com/advertising-has-the-power-to-make-children-fat-and-this-needs-to-stop-58899 As with […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 15th May 2016

1) John Oliver On Science This is late night American cable TV. Please do not watch this if you are likely to be offended by occasional references to sex and by swearing. It does however say s0me important and intelligent things about how science works and our understanding of it.   2) Rational Choice We have […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 7th May 2016

1) Google And Health Data In thinking about classification and diagnosis during lessons, we have had on the horizon for a while the idea that diagnoses of mental illness will be made on the basis of biomarkers measured via mobile devices. The data these devices generate has to be held somewhere. Stories have emerged this […]

Post Of The Week -Saturday 30th April 2016

1) Willem Kuyken on Mindfulness Based CBT A study has come out this week which shows that MCBT is effective in preventing relapse in people suffering multiple episodes of depression. You can read about that here. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy can prevent recurrent depression Kuyken gives an extended interview about this study and other issues connected […]