Tag Archives: obesity

Post Of The Week – Saturday 20th May 2017

1) Anorexia Nervosa In Young Children This article starts by looking at anorexia nervosa in pre-pubescent children and moves on to a more general and authoritative overview of what anorexia nervosa is and isn’t. The article focuses on family therapy while playing down the validity of family systems theory. Whilst social pressures and traumatic events […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday December 3rd 2016

1) Implications Of Research For The Economy This comes not from a piece of peer reviewed research but rather from a commercial research company. It suggests that lack of sleep costs the economy of the UK £40 billion because people who sleep less than seven hours a night are more at risk of illness and […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 6th November, 2016

1) Poverty And Mental Illness We have had a good time in Year 2 thinking about reductionism, holism and levels of explanation. This article focuses on the socio-cultural level of explanation. It asks whether poverty can lead to mental illness. One way of thinking about this is to focus on stress as an intervening factor. Another […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 4th September 2016

1) Surgery Ban Last week, I was working on biological explanations of obesity. I was looking for a news story I dimly remembered about people with obesity being denied surgery unless they could lose weight. I hunted around on the internet and found something. As it turned out, I needn’t have bothered as this has […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 31st July 2016

1) Genes For Obesity The story about genes for obesity is similar to other stories in Psychology. We know obesity runs in families but can’t yet say which particular genes are involved. That is changing though as more sophisticated genetic analysis comes on stream. We’ve known about the variant of FTO gene for a while […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday June 4th, 2016

1) Could A Neuroscientist Understand A Microprocessor? This article has as its starting point the analysis of the microprocessor which drove Mac computers 30 years ago. https://elusiveself.wordpress.com/2016/05/29/false-functional-inference-what-does-it-mean-to-understand-the-brain/ It leads to consideration of what we can and cannot infer about the brain. We tend to find the cognitive approach impressive because it uses computer models to describe the […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 29th May, 2016

1) Ethics We have looked at a few ethics questions as part of the revision process. Occasionally, they relate to studies involving children. The rules are clear. Parental consent is needed for children under the age of 16. New Questions Over Kids’ Company Brain Experiments This article relates to Kids’ Company, a charity which has […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 15th May 2016

1) John Oliver On Science This is late night American cable TV. Please do not watch this if you are likely to be offended by occasional references to sex and by swearing. It does however say s0me important and intelligent things about how science works and our understanding of it.   2) Rational Choice We have […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 7th May 2016

1) Google And Health Data In thinking about classification and diagnosis during lessons, we have had on the horizon for a while the idea that diagnoses of mental illness will be made on the basis of biomarkers measured via mobile devices. The data these devices generate has to be held somewhere. Stories have emerged this […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 20th March 2016

1) Grid Cells One of the videos on the Types Of Memory webpage shows a lecture by Eleanor Maguire. It explains the significance of grid cells. These enable mice to navigate around simple mazes. They are the first example thinking recorded as brain activity. We can infer what the mouse is thinking directly from patterns […]