Tag Archives: attachment

Post Of The Week – Sunday 14th January 2018

1) Uta Frith Talking About Alice Lee In this short BBC video, Uta Frith discusses Alice Lee’s pioneering research into brain size in the early 1900s. It’s a brilliant example of how Psychology works. This video on probability in the same series is almost as good.   2) John Dury On Crowds John Drury is […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 16th December, 2017

1) Crowds This radio programme from the BBC World Service explores the sociology and psychology of crowds.  It features Clifford Stott, who we see in the reconstruction of the Milgram procedure in the Year 1 course. It looks at the crowd as a source of social identity and also at the role which crowds play in social […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 19th November 2017

1) All In The Mind – Attachment You need to wind about ten minutes into this programme to find a discussion on attachment with Elizabeth Meins. She challenges the way in which attachment is linked to later disorders. She emphasises that attachments are not stable and change over time. She also challenges the idea that […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 30th July 2017

1) To The Bone This article acts as a commentary on “To The Bone”, a film about anorexia nervosa which is now available on Netflix. The article challenges the idea that watching the film could be harmful or triggering for people at risk of developing anorexia. To claim this, the article claims, is to misrepresent the […]

Post Of The Week – Monday 10th August 2015

1) Chemical Soup This TED talk from David Anderson comes from the same event as the one by Thomas Insel which we use in lessons. Anderson’s idea in this talk is that we tend to treat the brain as a chemical soup where things go wrong when the balance of ingredients is not quite right: […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 2nd August 2015

1) Early Experience This week, I have been preparing for the Attachment topic in the new AS. In stages of development, there is a controversy about how much babies can do in the early weeks of life. This research into the laughter of babies is part of the process of suggesting that they can do […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 21st August 2014

1) Uta Frith On The History Of Autism http://sfari.org/news-and-opinion/blog/2014/guest-blog-london-as-a-crucible-for-autism-in-the-1950s In this article, Uta Frith explains some of the background to the development of autism as a diagnosis. Three important ideas emerge from this. Firstly, it is worth reminding ourselves how recent the classification and diagnosis of autism is. Uta Frith started a PhD in 1964 at […]

The Influence Of Childhood On Adult Relationships – Why This Is Interesting

By the time you read this in your lesson, you will know how Bowlby’s and Ainsworth’s theories have been used to show how childhood experience influences adult relationships. You will also know some evidence about Ainsworth’s attachment types and adult relationships. You will know about how this evidence has been criticised and how different methods […]

Attachments And Family Therapy

“A further strength of Ainsworth’s classification of attachment types is that it has been applied to the development of family therapy and systemic therapy.” Since Ainsworth defined different types of attachment forty years ago, researchers have been working to refine her findings and to use them to help people deal with difficulties in their lives. […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 10th October

1) Rudi Dallos And Attachment Theory. Rudi Dallos is a professor at Plymouth University. He is also an expert in family therapy and in systemic therapy. Family therapy is what it says it is while systemic therapy helps people explore issues in their lives by seeing connections to different experiences and influences. This is relevant […]