1) Serotonin – The Happy Brain Chemical? There’s a problem with understanding the role of serotonin. SSRI antidepressants work by increasing the amount of serotonin available in the brain. They work, at least for some people, but only after a few weeks of medication. This begs the question of what serotonin does. One answer in […]

1) Collaboration, Collaboration, Collaboration One of the issues we look at when considering classification, diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders is co-morbidity. Put simply, people tend not to have conditions in isolation but have more than one thing wrong with them at a time. This becomes awkward when doctors are diagnosing conditions because they have […]

1) Neurotribes This book is by Steve Silberman. I have included a link to his TED Talk on autism on the blog before. The book has just won the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction. https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/rallying-call-respect-difference Here’s a review about it from The Psychologist. 2) Omega 3 For explanations for the success of dieting in A2, […]

1) Peering Inside The Brain This article looks at various attempts over the last 200 years to understand what happens inside our skulls. It refers to some of the exhibits in the Science Museum. If you are ever in London, there is some great Psychology stuff in there. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20151028-a-brief-history-of-our-desire-to-peer-into-the-brain 2) How Writing Makes People Smarter […]

1) Robert Plomin On “The Life Scientific”. Robert Plomin is a behavioural geneticist whose work has created a degree of controversy. You can listen to an extended interview with him here. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06j1qts Plomin’s big idea is that variations between individuals in academic success can be explained substantially by genes. This is the conclusion of a […]

1) Randomised Controlled Trials In Education I have been teaching people for a few years now that education suffers from a lack of RCTs. This is fundamentally because people do not wish to see students allocated to a condition randomly which may not be optimal for their education. This was what we learnt Term 1 […]

1) Cracking The Skull Open This article concerns the relationship between psychiatry and neuroscience. http://aeon.co/magazine/psychology/why-cant-we-unite-neuroscience-and-psychiatry/ It looks at how progress has been made with our understanding of other aspects of human physiology, for example the heart and cancer, contrasting progress there with ignorance in relation to how the brain works. Along the way, it demolishes […]

1) How Memories Form And How We Lose Them This is a TED-ED lesson aimed at a less specialist audience than us. It is still worth watching, touching on some of the issues in our course. 2) Suicide Prevention In Young People Here is a summary of some research into the effectiveness of interventions in […]

1) Keeping A Spotless Mind We’ve been getting interested in cognitive neuroscience in AS this week. We’ve been looking at the idea of looking inside the brain if we want to understand what actually happens when we remember something. We have also been thinking about how insights from neuroscience move us away from the mechanistic […]

1) Violent Video Games This Horizon documentary takes you through several pieces of research on video games. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06cjypk What’s interesting here is not so much the conclusion but the research process. We have some classic laboratory experiments, some correlational evidence, a study which addresses one significant extraneous variable and some current neuroscience. We end up […]


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 60 other followers