Tag Archives: OCD

Post Of The Week – Saturday 4th February 2017

1) Split Brains This article introduces some recent research involving split brain patients which on the face of it challenges the way in which we think of these patients. Its findings suggest that their consciousness is less divided than is suggested by the research of Sperry and Gazzaniga. In the end, there may be a […]

Post Of The Week – Monday 2nd January 2017

1) A Little Bit OCD This article explores the presentation of OCD in HBO’s “Girls”. It explains how it moves away from depicting OCD as being tidy and fastidious to explore the anxiety and misery at the heart of the condition. This article gives a fuller overview of how OCD is defined and understood.   […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 2nd October 2016

1) HM Yet Again Here is another piece about HM. This one features an interview with Brenda Milner, now in her nineties and one of the original researchers of HM. There’s a reminder of a detail which is on the video on the Types Of Long Term Memory of a study by Milner in which HM […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 24th July 2016

1) Turning Protest Into Powerful Change In the social change sub-topic, we look at how consistency, commitment and flexibility in the face of new evidence work to enable a minority to influence a majority. We look also at the role of majority social influence through normative and informational influence and at the role of authority figures. […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 19th September 2015

1) Violent Video Games This Horizon documentary takes you through several pieces of research on video games. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06cjypk What’s interesting here is not so much the conclusion but the research process. We have some classic laboratory experiments, some correlational evidence, a study which addresses one significant extraneous variable and some current neuroscience. We end up […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 12th September 2015

1) Screen Time And GCSEs This news story refers to a research report which tracks children’s activity over a few years and relates it to exam outcomes. Children who spend longer in front of a screen tend to do worse. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34139196 This is a great example of how correlational evidence works and, perhaps more importantly, […]