Tag Archives: CBT

Post Of The Week – Sunday 24th June, 2018

1) Romanian Orphanages One criticism of the English And Romanian Adoptees study is that it only deals with the children who were adopted, not those left behind. It therefore gives a more optimistic picture of recovery because the children picked for adoption may have been more resilient. This article describes research done on children who have […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday June 16th, 2018

1) The Genetics Of Depression There are two articles here. This one just out from the EDIT Lab looks at a paper published last year. It focuses on 44 genetic variations associated with depression. It makes the claim that “depression is largely a disorder of the brain”. In our course, we are encouraged to think […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 9th June 2018

1) Individual Differences Here is the latest blog from the EDIT Lab on individual differences. There is a reference in there to t tests and distributions which is relevant to us.   2) Depression And Inflammation When we study depression, we focus on depression as a disorder of thought. For evaluation, we consider whether depressions […]

Post Of The Week – Wednesday 23rd May, 2018

A few days late, due to the mock exams. 1) Maslow’s Hierarchy This piece from the BPS Digest looks at some common misconceptions about Maslow’s hierarchy. It points out that Maslow did not think that all needs have to be met at one level before moving on to the next level, nor did he think […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 21st April 2018

1) Genes For OCD This research came out in October last year but I only just found it. There’s a brief article here. The problem with understanding OCD to this point is that the evidence has been fragmentary. We know about genes, brain areas and serotonin but don’t know how they fit together. By isolating […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 14th April 2018

1) Educational Achievement And Genes When we study the nature-nurture debate, we look at the idea that the heritability of a trait depends on the quality of environment. In an environment with no food, genetic differences in vulnerability to obesity do not matter. In an educational environment where everyone has the support and the facilities […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday February 17th, 2018

1) Implanting False Memories A crucial claim of Elizabeth Loftus’ research is that it is possible to manipulate testimony and to implant false memories. We look at some of her research here. A problem with this research is that the memories which are implanted and manipulated seem trivial in comparison with the court cases to […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 14th January 2018

1) Uta Frith Talking About Alice Lee In this short BBC video, Uta Frith discusses Alice Lee’s pioneering research into brain size in the early 1900s. It’s a brilliant example of how Psychology works. This video on probability in the same series is almost as good.   2) John Dury On Crowds John Drury is […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 13th August, 2017

1) Smartphones This article looks at the effect of smartphones on children and adolescents. It challenges claims by Jean Twenge, whose work we look at in the context of locus of control, about the damaging effect of phones on well-being. It’s useful for us in a couple of ways. Firstly, it raises some research methods […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday 18th June 2017

1) The Psychology Of Cults Cults are interesting from a social psychological point of view. They are based on obedience to an authority figure and rely on compliance. This video from TED Ed touches on some other Psychology concepts.   2) The Smartphone Psychiatrist The psychiatrist in question is Tom Insel. This extended profile is […]