Tag Archives: eye witness testimony

Post Of The Week – Saturday 8th October 2016

1) Super Recognisers We’re on eye witness testimony in AS/Year 1. The research behind this link concerns officers whose job it is to recognise people from still images and CCTV: “super recognisers”. The research identified members of the public using a test in the Science Museum who were exceptionally good at this task. It found that […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 13th December 2014

1) Understanding Other People’s Actions In A2, we learn about mirror neurons. The AQA line, which we repeat in lessons, is that the mirror neuron system is fundamental to social cognition because it enables our brains to shadow the actions or expressions of others and understand what they are thinking and feeling. James Kilner from […]

Post Of The Week – Sunday, November 16th 2014

1) The Neuroscience Of Memory This year in AS Memory, I have given you the opportunity to see some current research on the neuroscience of memory. The idea has been to see how the models of forty or fifty years ago have been built on as we have understood more about how the brain works. […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 18th October, 2014

1) Memory, The Hippocampus And HM We’ve had an interesting week in AS looking at the multistore model of memory. In particular, it has been interesting to look at the link between the model and current research into memory. There is a story at the heart of this research which, on the face of it, […]

Post Of The Week – Saturday 27th September, 2014

1) Strategies For Memory Improvement I’ve been spending some of the week thinking about how we learn languages. I’ve set my Year 7s a homework where they have to learn some Latin words but also explain in a post on their Google Classroom page how they went about learning them. I’m hoping to have a […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 21st August 2014

1) Uta Frith On The History Of Autism http://sfari.org/news-and-opinion/blog/2014/guest-blog-london-as-a-crucible-for-autism-in-the-1950s In this article, Uta Frith explains some of the background to the development of autism as a diagnosis. Three important ideas emerge from this. Firstly, it is worth reminding ourselves how recent the classification and diagnosis of autism is. Uta Frith started a PhD in 1964 at […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 15th May, 2014

1) Randomised Controlled Trials In Education If you are in the A2 groups, you will have done this week a research methods test based on fictitious study of a teaching strategy. As I made it up, I wondered what would happen if such a study was conducted in real life. http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/kidding-ourselves-on-educational.html The answer to some […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 21st November

1) Eye Witness Testimony – The Innocence Project When we looked at the importance of Elizabeth Loftus’ research, we mentioned its application to cases of misidentification of criminals. The Innocence Project in the United States campaigns to exonerate prisoners who have been wrongly convicted of crimes. This exoneration often involves DNA evidence. I used to […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 3rd October

1) Dancing Statistics The British Psychological Society has just produced these videos to explain statistical concepts. AS students have seen the correlation one already. The others are also worth watching, although less directly relevant to the questions you will need to answer in the exams. 2) Reverse Engineering Dating Websites When we study the formation […]

Post Of The Week – Thursday 26th September

1) Asda and Tesco withdraw ‘psycho’ patient outfits http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24278768 This story has broken today and has caused an angry response in many people. These products perpetuate the stigma of mental health and the stereotype that people with mental health problems are diseased and dangerous. Many people have had their say in this BBC article. These include […]