Post Of The Week – Saturday 2nd June 2018

1) The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs

I happened to watch the second episode of this two part series. It is here. A substantial amount of the programme is devoted to the use of antidepressant drugs for adolescents. The programme features some important arguments from experts in this area and explains how clinical guidelines are established. It looks at alternatives to antidepressants. I thought it odd that the programme did not look at research into mindfulness training for young people. That appears in the first programme about ADHD which I haven’t seen. The programme is clear that anyone on antidepressants who wants to give them up needs to talk to his/her doctor.

 

2) Heritability

With nature-nurture in mind, this latest blogpost from the EDIT Lab explains heritability.

 

3) Schemas

When we study schemas as part of the cognitive approach, we consider how  the role of a schema is therefore to enable us to make sense of our environment quickly and to act without having to pay attention to every detail. This article explores different ways in which our brains make sense of our environment.

 

4) Eye Witness Interviews With Avatars

We have been working on the cognitive interview as a method of increasing the accuracy of eye witness testimony.  We have seen that there are some problems with it. This research looks at an alternative method for improving accuracy based on avatars.

 

5) Michael Rutter

Here is the great man being interviewed as part of Mental Health Awareness week. Humane, engaging, intelligent.

 

6) Excitation And Inhibition

We understand these concepts in relation to neurotransmission as part of our course, This research uses the concepts to describe neurons, explaining how a balance between excitation and inhibition is important for understanding how the brain develops.

 

7) Replicability

This article explains the problems of replication in Psychology and other areas of science really clearly.

 

8) How Humans Got Such Big Brains

Here’s a fine piece of science journalism from Ed Yong.

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