1) Understanding Other People’s Actions In A2, we learn about mirror neurons. The AQA line, which we repeat in lessons, is that the mirror neuron system is fundamental to social cognition because it enables our brains to shadow the actions or expressions of others and understand what they are thinking and feeling. James Kilner from […]

1) Pre-Frontal Cortex, Limbic System And Criticism From Your Parents In A2, we have just finished looking at biological explanations of social cognition. The big idea is that the limbic system organises our emotional responses while our prefrontal cortex inhibits and regulates them. Adolescence is the time when these systems reorganise themselves. This means that […]

1) We Don’t Do Schizophrenia But …. There has been some debate this week about a report by the British Psychological Society about psychosis and schizophrenia. It has attracted some controversy. The issues are discussed in depth and persuasively in this post from the Mental Elf here. http://www.thementalelf.net/treatment-and-prevention/medicines/antipsychotics/understanding-psychosis-and-schizophrenia-a-critique-by-laws-langford-and-huda/ If you scroll down, you can read […]

1) All In The Mind All In The Mind has started a new series. This week’s episode contained a feature on addiction and also a feature on Milgram. You can listen to it here. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04p86c8 We will use the section on addiction to start that topic: there is a link already on the Google page. […]

1) The Neuroscience Of Memory This year in AS Memory, I have given you the opportunity to see some current research on the neuroscience of memory. The idea has been to see how the models of forty or fifty years ago have been built on as we have understood more about how the brain works. […]

1) Repressed Memories Of Abuse At the end of last week, we watched Elizabeth Loftus’ TED talk on “The Fiction Of Memory” as an introduction into eye witness testimony and Loftus’ research. Our course focuses on eye witness testimony but Loftus’ work on recovered memories of abuse and the controversy that that research has produced […]

1) Attitudes To Mental Illness Although it seems a long way away, it is still my intention to carry on with research work from the last few years on attitudes to mental illness once the AS exams are over. A few things have happened this week which have made me realise that this remains an […]

1) Mindfulness http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-health/11161367/Mindfulness-does-it-really-live-up-to-the-hype.html#disqus_thread I’ve written posts about mindfulness and its relationship to therapy on this blog before. The difference this time is that I had a go at it during one of the training sessions I had to attend this week. It wasn’t the right time or place for me but I got a sense […]

1) Memory, The Hippocampus And HM We’ve had an interesting week in AS looking at the multistore model of memory. In particular, it has been interesting to look at the link between the model and current research into memory. There is a story at the heart of this research which, on the face of it, […]

1) How The Brain Navigates There has been some publicity about the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology to John O’Keefe of UCL and two Norwegian researchers, May-Britt Moser and Edward Moser. Their research has focused on the systems in the brain which allow rats to navigate. Here is the news story. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-29504761 This […]

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